Oct
17
4:30 PM16:30

For Our Future Generations: Bringing Karuk Baskets Back Home

  • Kroeber Hall, Room 221 (The Gifford Room), UC Berkeley (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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The Berkeley Folklore Roundtable Presents:

"For Our Future Generations: Bringing Karuk Baskets Back Home"

Professor Carolyn Smith
Wednesday October 17, 2018

4:30 PM
221 Kroeber Hall, Gifford Room
UC Berkeley

"This presentation explores Karuk Tribe efforts of bringing baskets back home through repatriation. I focus on the historical and contemporary narratives of Karuk engagements with museums and anthropologists, which have shaped the western definitions of Karuk baskets. Countering the categories of "utilitarian/ceremonial" vs. "made for trade" baskets, I illustrate how baskets are considered social beings—belongings—that “cry out” to be back where they came from. Finally, I describe what it means to weave pikyav (to-fix-it) and how this responsibility energizes Karuk dedication to bring baskets and other belongings back home."

Carolyn Smith (Karuk) is a Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California,
Berkeley in the Department of Ethnic Studies, where she is continuing her research on the
interconnections of the ontology of basketry, museum practice, and repatriation.

Sponsored by the Berkeley Folklore Graduate Program

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20
5:00 PM17:00

From Potosí to Tennessee

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Feb
6
5:00 PM17:00

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This Berkeley Folklore Roundtable talk explores the yearly reenactment of the Canboulay Riots of 1881 as well as a recent carnival band inspired by the colonial paintings of a celebrated Trinidadian artist of the early 19th century, Michel-Jean Cazabon. Philip Scher (Dean of Social Sciences, U. of Oregon) compares these examples as a meditation on the role of public historical narratives and contested memory in the ongoing construction of national identity in Trinidad.

 

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Dec
6
4:30 PM16:30

Critical Latinx Folkloristics for the 21st Century

  • Critical Latinx Folkloristics for the 21st Century (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Drawing on her ethnographic research on contemporary consumer culture associated with quinceañeras--elaborate coming-of-age celebrations for fifteen-year-old girls--and the social reception of racialized cultural practice, Dr. Rachel Valentina González-Martin (UT Austin) will discuss the state of folklore studies among, with, and through minoritized communities geographically located in the United States. Her focus will be primarily on the experience of Latina/o/x identifying women and youth living under different forms of national citizenships, analyzing how cultural practices rooted in translocal cultural experiences and transnational memories can be collaboratively narrated through a lens of race, class, and gender politics that prioritizes self-documentary/un-documentary practices as acts of ethnographic refusal and cultural re-imagination. 

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Apr
18
5:00 PM17:00

2017 Alan Dundes Lecture

Michael Silverstein, Charles F. Greg Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, presents "Trump l'Oeil and the Art of the @Real." The talk will take place in the Geballe Room of the Townsend Center for the Humanities (220 Stephens Hall), with reception to follow.

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Apr
16
10:00 AM10:00

38th Annual UC Berkeley Powwow

Please join us for this fabulous annual event sponsored and organized by UC Berkeley's Native American Recruitment and Retention Center (NARRC) and The UC Berkeley Powwow Committee. All events take place on campus, on the West Crescent Lawn. The Gourd Dance begins at 11 am, with the Grand Entry to follow at 12 pm. For more information, please click here to visit the Facebook page!

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